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Manipulate genealogy GEDCOM files using Wolfram Language?

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Robert Nachbar has an interesting Wolfram video http://www.wolfram.com/broadcast/video.php?c=400&p=2&v=1497 on using Mathematica to manipulate genealogy GEDCOM files. As far as I can see the video does not provide a link to a source for his package. Does antone know where I might find it?

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

Did you check the notebook? Don't have a laptop with me so can't check

http://library.wolfram.com/infocenter/Conferences/9268/

POSTED BY: l van Veen
Answer
3 months ago

Yes, i listened to the presentation and examined the notebook, No information of how to get his package.

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

Robert is a member of this community, so you can ping him as @Robert Nachbar. Perhaps this will reach him and he will give some more info.

POSTED BY: Kapio Letto
Answer
3 months ago

Thanks, but how do I "ping him as @Robert Nachbar." clicking on @Robert Nachbar. tells me all about him but no contact info. This may all be moot as I ended up writing my own code.

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

Apologies for not being clear, but simply typing @Robert N... etc. will bring a list of people in the interface. When you select name needed and post an automated email will be sent to notify the member referenced.

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POSTED BY: Kapio Letto
Answer
3 months ago

Thank you. Robert did contact me by the way.

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

Hi, sorry I didn't see this thread sooner, I was out of town.

I intentionally omitted the package from the download site because it was not ready for general use. I have since started a major overhaul, and it is going very well, although slowly as this work is really a hobby and I get back to it only sporadically.

The new version makes use of Association and objects (e.g., individuals, families) are overloaded similarly to entities so that one can easily extract their properties without having to use special functions for that purpose.

POSTED BY: Robert Nachbar
Answer
3 months ago

Thanks for responding. I've ended up attempting to do my own coding. Not very elegant, but I am getting there. I am using associations and data sets. I found that for some reason my Mathematica (ver 11.01) stopped reading the .ged file. It was working fine for a few days and then when i updated my Ancestry tree, and downloaded a new GEDCOM, The "Import" sent a message that it didn't know how to open the file. By changing the extension to .txt, it opens as a long sting of text, from which I can then pull out what I need. For simplicity I am just using INDI, NAME, FAMC and FAMS. The GEDCOM file also has an awful lot of junk at the end that isn't associated with any individual. i have no idea what is does. I can build a tree from Graph but I think there are still some errors in the construction of edges. I don't particularly like using a family as a separate vertex. spouse-> family <- spouse and family->Child1, etc. but I can't think of any other way to do it using Graph[vertices, edges].

Ron Gove

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

Use Import["file.ged", "Lines"] to get the data as a list of strings, one for each line of the file. I hope Ancestry.com has not started using a new GEDCOM spec. My code is based on Release 5.5. I recall reading about an XML version in development, but I don't have any details.

I'd have to see your specific GEDCOM file to know what are the data at the end, but I suspect they are records for information about the resources in Ancestry.com that your individuals and families reference. Look for SOUR, REPO, NOTE at level 0. I currently ignore those data in my package.

Family trees are not your "normal" n-ary tree. One really needs the family vertex between two spouse vertices from which the child vertices are pendant. The graph is bipartite, with individuals in one class and families in the other. This structure become even more important when there second, third, etc. marriages. GEDCOM does support adoption records, but I'm not sure about the bet way to make the connections between the child and its biological and adoptive parents. The tree rendering in Ancestry.com is less than optimal, although they do a good job of collapsing peripheral portions.

POSTED BY: Robert Nachbar
Answer
3 months ago

I just tried Import["file.ged", "Lines"] and it worked perfectly. the end stuff is as you said like this:{"1 TITL Mayflower Births and Deaths, Vol. 1 and 2", "1 AUTH \ Ancestry.com", "1 PUBL Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.", "1 _APID \ 1,3718::0", "0 @S113467862@ SOUR", "1 TITL \ <a href="http://mayflowerhistory.com/brewster-william/"">http://mayflowerhistory.com/brewster-william/", "1 NOTE ", "0 \ @S113591755@ SOUR", "1 REPO @R100735530@", "1 TITL Canada, Find A \ Grave Index, 1600s-Current", "1 AUTH Ancestry.com", "1 PUBL \ Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.", "1 _APID 1,60527::0", "0 @S113613092@ \ SOUR", "1 REPO @R100735530@", "1 TITL Great Migration Begins: \

I find genealogy quite fascinating. I have discovered that I am a Mayflower descendant from 2 families, Stephen Hopkins and his 2 children Giles and Constance. Plus i am a distant cousin of Sarah Palin (She is also a Hopkins descendant) and a distant cousin of Mark Twain Immigrants to New England, 1620-33", "1 AUTH Robert Charles \ Anderson", "1 PUBL Ancestry.com Operations Inc", "1 _APID 1,4714::0", \ "0 TRLR"}

Thanks again.

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

Cool!

Glad I could help.

Would you be willing to beta-test my package when it gets to that point?

POSTED BY: Robert Nachbar
Answer
3 months ago

Yes, I'd love the chance to test it

Ron

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

OBYW, I left out the other Mayflower family, William Brewster.
There are scads of cousin marriages among the early settlers of Massachusetts, which probably explains a lot about Yankee personality.

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

Well, let's not jump to conclusions. Marriage between first cousins was common well into the the 19-th century throughout the US and UK.

I wonder how easy it would be to get the statistics on that.

POSTED BY: Robert Nachbar
Answer
3 months ago

That would be a very interesting statistic. Maybe a good Masters Thesis project in History or Sociology. By the way, I am 74 years old and a retired Mathematician.

POSTED BY: Ron
Answer
3 months ago

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