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Core language (Tutorial Collection) - pages 98 and 99

GROUPS:
Dear:

Reading the Core Language cited above I typed the following instructions:
 odeplot[de_, y_, {x_, x0_, x1_}, opts : OptionsPattern[]] :=
 
  Module[{sol},
   sol = NDSolve[de, y, {x, x0, x1},
     FilterRules[{opts}, Options[NDSolve]]];
   if[Head[sol] === NDSolve,
    $Failed,
    Plot[Evaluate[y /. sol], {x, x0, x1},
    Evaluate[FilterRules[{opts}, Options[Plot]]]]
   ]
  ]
odeplot[{y''[x] + y[x] == 0, y[0] == 1, y'[0] == 0}, y[x], {x, 0, 10}]

Unfortunatelly it did not work but it worked when I delete the If, as you can see bellow (Plts Attachded):
odeplot[de_, y_, {x_, x0_, x1_}, opts : OptionsPattern[]] :=

Module[{sol},
  sol = NDSolve[de, y, {x, x0, x1},
    FilterRules[{opts}, Options[NDSolve]]];
  Plot[Evaluate[y /. sol], {x, x0, x1},
   Evaluate[FilterRules[{opts}, Options[Plot]]]]
  ]

Could you help me why does not work a simple program from Tutorial Collection ?

Thanks,
Ana
Attachments:
POSTED BY: Ana Squadri
Answer
7 months ago
The "if" needs to start with the uppercase "I" as in "If". All built-in Mathematica commands must start with uppcase letters.
POSTED BY: Isaac Abraham
Answer
7 months ago
Effectively (If) command must have the i capitalized, the rest seems okay, here is the example of your code running
odeplot[de_, y_, {x_, x0_, x1_}, opts : OptionsPattern[]] :=
Module[{sol},
  sol = NDSolve[de, y, {x, x0, x1},
    FilterRules[{opts}, Options[NDSolve]]];
  If[Head[sol] === NDSolve, $Failed,
   Plot[Evaluate[y /. sol], {x, x0, x1},
    Evaluate[FilterRules[{opts}, Options[Plot]]]]]]
Example
odeplot[{y''[x] + y[x] == 0, y[0] == 1, y'[0] == 0}, y[x], {x, 0, 10}]


Greetings
POSTED BY: luis ledesma
Answer
7 months ago
Where did you guys learn the syntax for the wolfram language? Also are there any ways to use it without the raspberry pi?
POSTED BY: Omer Ronen
Answer
7 months ago
Wolfram Language is, basically, the language of Mathematica.  (Present-tense verb, stay tuned.) 

Two pages I often point newbies to are,

  http://reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/tutorial/GettingUsedToMathematica.html

  http://reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/tutorial/GettingStartedOverview.html

I see that there is a WL equivalent for the latter:

  http://reference.wolfram.com/language/tutorial/GettingStartedOverview.html
POSTED BY: Bruce Miller
Answer
7 months ago
Thank you!!!
POSTED BY: Omer Ronen
Answer
7 months ago
it would be more accurate, i think, to say that Mathematica was the first knowledge domain in which the Wolfram Language was used. WL is a stand-alone programming language (i have programmed in it for 28 years and have only used a mathematical function one time). it is applicable to MANY fields besides mathematics and physics and engineering - in fact, to ANY field in which computation is employed.
POSTED BY: Richard Gaylord
Answer
6 months ago

Ally Clinton,

We are sorry your post was mangled.

Please try again. If the problem persists, please contact the moderators at
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POSTED BY: Ally Clinton
Answer
2 months ago