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Adaptive numerical Lebesgue integration by set measure estimates

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Introduction

In this post are given outlines and examples of several related implementations of Lebesgue integration, [1], within the framework of NIntegrate, [7]. This post mirrors the more detailed exposition given in the WordPress blog post with the same name and related code and documentation in MathematicaForPrediction at GitHub.

The focus is on the implementations of Lebesgue integration algorithms that have multiple options and can be easily extended (in order to do further research, optimization, etc.) In terms of NIntegrate's framework terminology it is shown how to implement an integration strategy or integration rule based on the theory of the Lebesgue integral. The full implementation of those strategy and rules -- LebesgueIntegration, LebesgueIntegrationRule, and GridLebesgueIntegrationRule -- are given in the Mathematica package [5].

The advantage of using NIntegrate's framework is that a host of supporting algorithms can be employed for preprocessing, execution, experimentation, and testing (correctness, comparison, and profiling.)

Here is a brief description of the integration strategy LebesgueIntegration in [5]:

  1. prepare a function that calculates measure estimates based on random points or low discrepancy sequences of points in the integration domain;

  2. use NIntegrate for the computation of one dimensional integrals for that measure estimate function over the range of the integrand function values.

The strategy is adaptive because of the second step -- NIntegrate uses adaptive integration algorithms.

Instead of using an integration strategy we can "tuck in" the whole Lebesgue integration process into an integration rule, and then use that integration rule with the adaptive integration algorithms NIntegrate already has. This is done with the implementations of the integration rules LebesgueIntegrationRule and GridLebesgueIntegrationRule.

Loading the package

Import["https://raw.githubusercontent.com/antononcube/MathematicaForPrediction/master/Misc/AdaptiveNumericalLebesgueIntegration.m"]

Brief theory

Lebesgue integration extends the definition of integral to a much larger class of functions than the class of Riemann integrable functions. The Riemann integral is constructed by partitioning the integrand's domain (on the $x$ axis). The Lebesgue integral is constructed by partitioning the integrand's co-domain (on the $y$ axis). For each value $y$ in the co-domain, find the measure $\mu(y)$ of the corresponding set of points $\frac{y}{f}$ in the domain. Roughly speaking, the Lebesgue integral is then the sum of all the products $\mu(y) y$; see [1] . For our implementation purposes $\mu$ is defined differently, and in the rest of this section we follow [3].

Consider the non-negative bound-able measurable function $f$:

$$ y=f(x), f(x) \geq 0, x \in \Omega .$$

We denote by $\mu(y)$ the measure for the points in $\Omega$ for which $f(x)>=y$, i.e.

(@mf) $$ \mu(y) := \left| \{ x: x\in \Omega \land f(x) \geq y\} \right| . $$

The Lebesgue integral of $f(x)$ over $\Omega$ can be be defined as:

$$ \int_{\Omega } f (x) dx = y_0 \mu (y_0) + \lim_{n \to \infty ,\max \left(y_i-y_{i-1}\right)\to 0} \sum_{i=1}^n \mu(y_i)(y_i-y_{i-1}) .$$

Further, we can write the last formula as

(@lint) $$ \int_{\Omega } f(x) dx = y_0 \mu(y_0) + \int_{y_0}^{y_n}\mu(y) dy.$$

The restriction $f(x)>=0$ can be handled by defining the following functions $f_1$ and $f_2$ :

$$ f_1(x) := \frac{1}{2} (\left| f(x) \right| + f(x) ), $$

$$ f_2(x) := \frac{1}{2} (\left| f(x) \right| - f(x) ), $$

and using the formula

$$ \int_{\Omega}f(x) dx= \int_{\Omega} f_1(x) dx - \int_{\Omega}f_2(x) dx. $$

Since finding analytical expressions of $\mu$ is hard we are going to look into ways of approximating $\mu$.

For more details see [1,2,3,4].

(Note, that the theoretical outline the algorithms considered can be seen as algorithms that reduce multidimensional integration to one dimensional integration.)

Algorithm walk through

We can see that because of Equation (@lint) we mostly have to focus on estimating the measure function $\mu$. This section provides a walk through with visual examples of a couple of stochastic ways to do that.

Consider the integral

$$ \int_{0}^{1} \int_{0}^{1} \sqrt{x_1 + x_2 + 1} dx_1 dx_2 . $$

In order to estimate $\mu$ in $\Omega := [0,1] \times [0,1]$ for $f(x_1, x_2) := \sqrt( 1 + x_1 + x_2 )$ we are going to generate in $\Omega$ a set $P$ of low discrepancy sequence of points, [2] . Here this is done with $100$ points of the so called "Sobol" sequence:

n = 100;
SeedRandom[0,Method -> {"MKL",Method -> {"Sobol", "Dimension" -> 2}}];
points = RandomReal[{0, 1}, {n, 2}];
ListPlot[points, AspectRatio -> Automatic,
 PlotTheme -> "Detailed",
 FrameLabel -> {"\!\(\*SubscriptBox[\(x\), \(1\)]\)","\!\(\*SubscriptBox[\(x\), \(2\)]\)"}]

Adaptive-Numerical-Lebesgue-integration-SobolPoints

To each point $p_i$ let us assign a corresponding "volume" $v_i$ that can be used to approximate $\mu$ with Equation (@mf). We can of course easily assign such volumes to be $\frac{1}{\left| P\right| }$, but as it can be seen on the plot this would be a good approximation for a larger number of points. Here is an example of a different volume assignment using a Voronoi diagram, [10]:

vmesh = VoronoiMesh[points, {{0, 1}, {0, 1}}, Frame -> True];
Show[{vmesh, Graphics[{Red, Point[points]}]},
 FrameLabel -> {"\!\(\*SubscriptBox[\(x\), \(1\)]\)", "\!\(\*SubscriptBox[\(x\), \(2\)]\)"}]

Adaptive-Numerical-Lebesgue-integration-VoronoiMeshVolumes

(The Voronoi diagram for $P$ finds for each point $p_i$ the set of domain points closest to $p_i$ than any other point of $P$.)

Here is a breakdown of the Voronoi diagram volumes corresponding to the generated points (compare with $\frac{1}{\left| P\right| }$) :

volumes =PropertyValue[{vmesh, Dimensions[points][[2]]}, MeshCellMeasure]; 
Histogram[volumes, PlotRange -> All, PlotTheme -> "Detailed",
 FrameLabel -> {"volume", "count"}]

Adaptive-Numerical-Lebesgue-integration-VoronoiMeshVolumes-Histogram

Let us define a function that computes $\mu$ according to Equation (2) with the generated points and assigned volumes:

EstimateMeasure[fval_?NumericQ, pointVals_, pointVolumes_] :=
  Block[{pinds},
   pinds = Clip[Sign[pointVals - fval], {0, 1}, {0, 1}];
   pointVolumes.pinds
  ];

Here is an example call of that function using the Voronoi diagram volumes:

EstimateMeasure[1.6, Sqrt[2 + Total[#]] & /@ points, volumes]
(* 0.845833 *)

And here is another call using uniform volumes:

EstimateMeasure[1.6, Sqrt[2 + Total[#]] & /@ points,
  Table[1/Length[points], {Length[points]}]] // N
(* 0.85 *)

The results can be verified using ImplicitRegion:

RegionMeasure[ImplicitRegion[ Sqrt[2 + x1 + x2] >= 1.6, {{x1, 0, 1}, {x2, 0, 1}}]]
(* 0.8432 *)

Or using Integrate:

Integrate[Piecewise[{{1, Sqrt[2 + x1 + x2] >= 1.6}}, 0], {x1, 0, 1}, {x2, 0, 1}]
(* 0.8432 *)

At this point we are ready to compute the integral estimate using Formula (4) :

fvals = Sqrt[2 + Total[#]] & /@ points;
Min[fvals]*EstimateMeasure[0, fvals, volumes] +
 NIntegrate[EstimateMeasure[y, fvals, volumes], {y, Min[fvals], Max[fvals]}]
(* 1.72724 *)

To simplify the code we use the symbol $\text{fvals}$ to hold the values $f P$. Note that instead of the true min and max values of $f$ we use estimates of them with $\text{fvals}$.

Here is the verification of the result:

Integrate[Sqrt[2 + x1 + x2], {x1, 0, 1}, {x2, 0, 1}]
% // N
(* 8/15 (16 + 2 Sqrt[2] - 9 Sqrt[3]) *)
(* 1.72798 *)

In order to implement the outlined algorithm so it will be more universal we have to consider volumes rescaling, function positivity, and Voronoi diagram implementation(s). For details how these considerations are resolved see the code of the strategy LebesgueIntegration in [5].

Implementation design within NIntegrate's framework

Basic usages

The strategy and rule implementations in [5] can be used in the following ways.

NIntegrate[Sqrt[x], {x, 0, 2}, Method -> LebesgueIntegration]
(* 1.88589 *)

NIntegrate[Sqrt[x], {x, 0, 2},
 Method -> {LebesgueIntegration, Method -> "LocalAdaptive",
   "Points" -> 2000, "PointGenerator" -> "Sobol"}, PrecisionGoal -> 3]
(* 1.88597 *)

NIntegrate[Sqrt[x], {x, 0, 2},
 Method -> {LebesgueIntegrationRule, "Points" -> 2000,
   "PointGenerator" -> "Sobol",
   "PointwiseMeasure" -> "VoronoiMesh"}, PrecisionGoal -> 3]
(* 1.88597 *)

NIntegrate[Sqrt[x + y + x], {x, 0, 2}, {y, 0, 3}, {z, 0, 4},
 Method -> {GridLebesgueIntegrationRule,
   Method -> "GaussKronrodRule", "Points" -> 2000,
   "GridSizes" -> 5, "PointGenerator" -> "Sobol"}, PrecisionGoal -> 3]
(* 43.6364 *)

Options

Here are the options for the implemented strategy and rules in [5]:

Grid[Transpose[{#, ColumnForm[Options[#]]} & /@
 {LebesgueIntegration,LebesgueIntegrationRule,
  GridLebesgueIntegrationRule}],
   Alignment -> Left, Dividers -> All]

Lebesgue methods options

Using variable ranges

Integration with variable ranges works "out of the box."

NIntegrate[Sqrt[x + y], {x, 0, 2}, {y, 0, x}]
(* 2.75817 *)

NIntegrate[Sqrt[x + y], {x, 0, 2}, {y, 0, x},
 Method -> LebesgueIntegration, PrecisionGoal -> 2]
(* 2.75709 *)

NIntegrate[Sqrt[x + y], {x, 0, 2}, {y, 0, x},
 Method -> LebesgueIntegrationRule, PrecisionGoal -> 2]
(* 2.75663 *)

Evaluation monitoring

With the option "EvaluationMonitor" we can see the sampling points for the strategy and the rules.

This is straightforward for the rules:

res = Reap@
   NIntegrate[Exp[-3 (x - 1)^2], {x, 0, 3},
    Method -> LebesgueIntegrationRule,
    EvaluationMonitor :> Sow[x], PrecisionGoal -> 3];
ListPlot[res[[2, 1]]]

Lebesgue rule sampling points

The strategy LebesgueIntegration uses an internal variable for the calculation of the Lebesgue integral. In "EvaluationMonitor" either that variable has to be used, or a symbol name has to be passed though the option "LebesgueIntegralVariableSymbol". Here is an example:

res = Reap@
   NIntegrate[Sqrt[x + y + z], {x, -1, 2}, {y, 0, 1}, {z, 1, 12},
    Method -> {LebesgueIntegration, "Points" -> 600,
      "PointGenerator" -> "Sobol",
      "LebesgueIntegralVariableSymbol" -> fval},
    EvaluationMonitor :> {Sow[fval]}, PrecisionGoal -> 3];
res = DeleteCases[res, fval, \[Infinity]];
ListPlot[res[[2, 1]]]

Lebesgue strategy sampling points

Profiling

We can use NIntegrate's utility functions for visualization and profiling in order to do comparison of the implemented algorithms with related ones (like "AdaptiveMonteCarlo") which NIntegrate has (or are plugged-in).

Needs["Integration`NIntegrateUtilities`"]

Function and domain:

fexpr = 1/(375/100 - Cos[x] - Cos[y]);
ranges = {{x, 0, \[Pi]}, {y, 0, \[Pi]}};

Profile parameters:

pgen = "Random";
npoints = 1000;

LebesgueIntegrationRule call:

NIntegrateProfile[
 NIntegrate[fexpr, Evaluate[Sequence @@ ranges],
  Method -> {"GlobalAdaptive",
    Method -> {LebesgueIntegrationRule,
      "PointGenerator" -> pgen, "Points" -> npoints,
      "AxisSelector" -> "MinVariance",
      Method -> "ClenshawCurtisRule"},
    "SingularityHandler" -> None}, PrecisionGoal -> 3]
 ]
 (* {"IntegralEstimate" -> InputForm[2.836659588960318], "Evaluations" -> 13000, "Timing" -> 0.384246} *)

Algorithms versions and options

There are multiple architectural, coding, and interface decisions to make while doing implementations like the ones in [5] and described in this document. The following mind map provides an overview of alternatives and interactions between components and parameters.

<img src="http://i.imgur.com/fztXmYOm.png" alt=""Adaptive Lebesgue Integration Mind-map""/>

Alternative implementations

In many ways using the Lebesgue integration rule with the adaptive algorithms is similar to using NIntegrate's "AdaptiveMonteCarlo" and its rule "MonteCarloRule". Although it is natural to consider plugging-in the Lebesgue integration rules into "AdaptiveMonteCarlo" at this point NIntegrate's framework does not allow "AdaptiveMonteCarlo" the use of a rule different than "MonteCarloRule".

We can consider using Monte Carlo algorithms for estimating the measures corresponding to a vector of values (that come from a 1D integration rule). This can be easily done, but it is not that effective because of the way NIntegrate handles vector integrands and because of stopping criteria issues when the measures are close to $0$.

Future plans

One of the most interesting extensions of the described Lebesgue integration algorithms and implementation designs is their extension with more advanced features of Mathematica for geometric computation. (Like the functions VoronoiMesh, RegionMeasure, and ImplicitRegion used above.)

Another interesting direction is the derivation and use of symbolic expressions for the measure functions. (Hybrid symbolic and numerical algorithms can be obtained as NIntegrate's handling of piecewise functions or the strategy combining symbolic and numerical integration described in [9].)

References

[1] Wikipedia entry, Lebesgue integration, URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lebesgue_integration .

[2] Wikipedia entry, Low-discrepancy sequence, URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-discrepancy_sequence .

[3] B. L. Burrows, A new approach to numerical integration, 1. Inst. Math. Applics., 26(1980), 151-173.

[4] T. He, Dimensionality Reducing Expansion of Multivariate Integration, 2001, Birkhauser Boston. ISBN-13:978-1-4612-7414-8 .

[5] A. Antonov, Adaptive Numerical Lebesgue Integration Mathematica Package, 2016, MathematicaForPrediction project at GitHub.

[6] A. Antonov, Lebesgue integration, Wolfram Demonstrations Project, 2007. URL: http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/LebesgueIntegration .

[7] "Advanced Numerical Integration in the Wolfram Language", Wolfram Research Inc. URL: https://reference.wolfram.com/language/tutorial/NIntegrateOverview.html .

[8] A. Antonov, "How to implement custom integration rules for use by NIntegrate?", (2016) Mathematica StackExchange answer, URL: http://mathematica.stackexchange.com/a/118326/34008 .

[9] A. Antonov, "How to implement custom NIntegrate integration strategies?", (2016) Mathematica StackExchange answer, URL: http://mathematica.stackexchange.com/a/118922/34008 .

[10] Wikipedia entry, Voronoi diagram, URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voronoi_diagram .

[11] Press, W.H. et al., Numerical Recipes in C (2nd Ed.): The Art of Scientific Computing, 1992, Cambridge University Press, New York, NY, USA.

POSTED BY: Anton Antonov
Answer
1 year ago

enter image description here - another post of yours has been selected for the Staff Picks group, congratulations !

We are happy to see you at the top of the "Featured Contributor" board. Thank you for your wonderful contributions, and please keep them coming!

POSTED BY: Moderation Team
Answer
1 year ago

Great, thanks!

POSTED BY: Anton Antonov
Answer
1 year ago

Here is the mind map of the algorithm variations and parameters which does not show in the opening discussion:

enter image description here

POSTED BY: Anton Antonov
Answer
1 year ago

Could you tell us after what text this map is located so we try to fix it?

POSTED BY: Moderation Team
Answer
1 year ago

Please, see the section "Algorithms versions and options". Right now I see the HTML code

'<img src="http://i.imgur.com/fztXmYOm.png" alt=""Adaptive Lebesgue Integration Mind-map""/>"

instead of the mind-map image. Since the not-working-fragment is using an imgur.com link, I decided try the work-around of uploading the mind-map image directly into community.wolfram.com and that worked.

POSTED BY: Anton Antonov
Answer
1 year ago

This is really cool

POSTED BY: Eduardo Serna
Answer
1 year ago

Thanks, good to hear.

POSTED BY: Anton Antonov
Answer
1 year ago

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