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My wild guess would be it's based on [SURF][1] or SIFT methods, like `ImageKeypoints`. [1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speeded_up_robust_features
This may or may not be a good place to drop my armchair math question, since it also involves apparent patterns related to primes. I recently doodled with [prime-generating polynomials][1] of form x^2 + x + n. An approximation of these can be...
@Rodrigo Murta Someone from WRI commented this - no doubt without official guarantees - recently on Mathematica StackExchange chat, and yes, it would appear to be actively worked on by them. A side note: comments I posted (almost a year ago!)...
I have disabled discrete graphics. I haven't made any specific experiments on measuring battery lifetime, but usually Energy view correlates well with real energy use.
Importing a map of your place (probably as a picture), and devising a tour on it on a specified speed, with an interactive indicator of where you should be on a specific moment, and then collecting data tied to interpolated locations may provide you...
@BillSimpson My version doesn't recognize complexes even if Re and Im parts are rational. I'm not certain if original poster was interested of that, either. Also, my version leaves function for Real numbers (in the Mathematica sense; that is,...
@bjs It is really an overstatement to say that Arduino, in its' AVR incarnations, has an operating system. Rather, it has statically linked runtime and libraries, which exist explicitly mostly on source level, but not really on machine code level....
Another thing worth of mention is that, in comparison to many other languages, Wolfram language rarely spits error messages that those other languages generate on erroneus input. This is because very wide range of input is perfectly valid, but unless...
The videos (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-I6XTVZXww and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-d9mgo8FGk) somehow manage to avoid telling...
Thankfully rare stumbling block in Mathematica: you can insert invisible operators in equations. I think I managed to find a shortcut for invisible addition (or something similar) once, and scratched my head for half and hour trying to understand...