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Mathematica crashes when I rotate my 3D image with my mouse

Hi, I am using Mathematica 10.1.0.0 on my MacBook Pro (10.10.3). Also, I recently updated Command Line Tools (OS X 10.10). Here is the code that is causing a problem.

Show[
 ContourPlot3D[{x == 0, y == 0, z == 0},
  {x, -3, 3}, {y, -3, 3}, {z, -3, 3},
  ContourStyle -> {Opacity[0.8]},
  Mesh -> {Range[-3, 3, 1], Range[-3, 3, 1], Range[-3, 3, 1]},
  Lighting -> "Neutral",
  AxesLabel -> {x, y, z},
  Ticks -> {Range[-3, 3, 1], Range[-3, 3, 1], Range[-3, 3, 1]},
  FaceGrids -> {{{0, 0, -1}, {Range[-3, 3], Range[-3, 3]}}},
  ViewPoint -> {3, 1, 2}],
 Graphics3D[{EdgeForm[Directive[Thick, Dashed, Blue]],
   Opacity[0.8], White, Cuboid[{{0, 0, 0}, {1, -1, 2}}],
   Red, PointSize[Large], Point[{1, -1, 2}]}]
 ]

When I rotate the image, it suddenly goes black, producing the following image.

enter image description here

Similarly, the following code causes the same problem.

Show[ContourPlot3D[x + y == 2, {x, -5, 5}, {y, -5, 5}, {z, -5, 5},
  Mesh -> None,
  ContourStyle -> {Cyan, Opacity[.8]},
  AxesLabel -> {x, y, z},
  Ticks -> {Range[-5, 5, 1], Range[-5, 5, 1], Range[-5, 5, 1]},
  ViewPoint -> {5, 5, 5},
  FaceGrids -> {{{0, 0, -1}, {Range[-5, 5], Range[-5, 5]}}}],
 ContourPlot3D[z == 0, {x, -5, 5}, {y, -5, 5}, {z, -5, 5},
  Mesh -> 11,
  ContourStyle -> Opacity[0.8]],
 Graphics3D[{Blue, Thick,
   Arrow[{{-5, 0, 0}, {5, 0, 0}}],
   Arrow[{{0, -5, 0}, {0, 5, 0}}],
   Arrow[{{0, 0, -5}, {0, 0, 5}}],
   }]]

I went to my office machine, IMac (OS x 10.10.3), which is running Mathematica 10.0.2.0 and which has not had an update of Command Line Tools (OS X 10.10) and both pieces of code worked fine. No rotating of the images caused a black crash image. I then updated the Command Line Tools (OS X 10.10) and after the installation was complete, shut the computer down. I then restarted the office computer and ran the code again. Once again, rotating the images with the mouse did not cause a crash.

So, I am very puzzled on how I can fix this problem on my laptop MacBook Pro.

Any thoughts?

P.S. I have submitted a reported to Wolfram, including the code. I have also attached the file that is causing the problem.

Attachments:
POSTED BY: David Arnold
10 Replies

I just performed a weird trial. I was working on the same file I sent you and being careful not to rotate the images. So I was not experiencing the black crash images at the moment. I copied the first code to a new file, ran it, then rotated it all over the place, and it didn't crash. Then I went back to the file I copied from and rotated an image in there and it immediately was a black crash. then I clicked on the new file where I copied the code and I had a black image there, even though it was fine when I left to go to the original file.

Now I have closed the files, quit Mathematica, then reopened Mathematica. Then I reopened the original file that caused the problem. I started rotating the image and it wasn't crashing black, so I rotated and rotated and I saw flashes of black that came and went.

This is so weird.

Let me share one more thing with you. I don't know if this is relevant or not. But sometimes when I leave my laptop on, but close the cover, when I open it I am not connected to the internet. If I click Turn Wi-Fi off, then click Wi-Fi on, I am connected. I also experience this with my laptop when I was at work at the College of the Redwoods.

One more thing that happened. As I was working on the original file, I heard a "beep." I went to the help menu and selected "Why the Beep" and read something about the local kernel exiting or some such thing?

I am rotating the image again and it is staying, but I am seeing flashed of the whole region turning black every now and then.

I really don't know what is going on.

POSTED BY: David Arnold

I contacted Wolfram Support and they recommended that I reinstall Mathematica, following these directions:

http://support.wolfram.com/kb/12473

It seems to have worked. Rotated images are no longer turning black.

We'll see how it goes in the future.

D.

POSTED BY: David Arnold

Model Name: MacBook Pro Model Identifier: MacBookPro11,3 Processor Name: Intel Core i7 Processor Speed: 2.3 GHz

Intel Iris Pro:

Chipset Model: Intel Iris Pro Type: GPU Bus: Built-In VRAM (Dynamic, Max): 1536 MB Vendor: Intel (0x8086) Device ID: 0x0d26 Revision ID: 0x0008 gMux Version: 4.0.8 [3.2.8]

Chipset Model: NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M Type: GPU Bus: PCIe PCIe Lane Width: x8 VRAM (Total): 2048 MB Vendor: NVIDIA (0x10de) Device ID: 0x0fe9 Revision ID: 0x00a2 ROM Revision: 3776 gMux Version: 4.0.8 [3.2.8] Displays: Color LCD: Display Type: Retina LCD Resolution: 2880 x 1800 Retina Retina: Yes Pixel Depth: 32-Bit Color (ARGB8888) Main Display: Yes Mirror: Off Online: Yes Built-In: Yes

Think this is what you need?

POSTED BY: David Arnold

Yes. You have the exact same model and configuration as me.

Is it correct that the Mathematica FrontEnd is crashing after displaying these color-inverted images? If so, could you provide the crash report as plain-text?

Thank you.

POSTED BY: Christopher Cole

The first one that happened today is attached. The report did not occur until I closed Mathematica and tried to reopen (not sure if it is when I tried to reopen the file, but I think so).

Attachments:
POSTED BY: David Arnold

Are you able to consistently reproduce the inverted graphics colors and subsequent crash with the notebook you attached? If so, how long does it take after launching Mathematica before the bug manifests itself? The crash report you posted indicates that Mathematica ran out of available memory address space.

POSTED BY: Christopher Cole

I do not suspect that the command line tools have any effect on the behavior you observe. I was unable to reproduce the behavior on my MBP, but it might have different hardware. Wolfram support will probably ask you for this information as well, but it would aid my attempts to diagnose the problem if you could provide details about the machine on which you observe them. Specifically, it would be useful to know the Model Identifier, Display(s), and GPU(s). For example, here is the relevant details on my own machine from System Information:

Model Identifier: MacBookPro11,3 Processor Name: Intel Core i7 Processor Speed: 2.3 GHz

Intel Iris Pro: Chipset Model: Intel Iris Pro Type: GPU Bus: Built-In

Displays: Color LCD: Display Type: Retina LCD Resolution: 2880 x 1800 Retina Retina: Yes Pixel Depth: 32-Bit Color (ARGB8888) Main Display: Yes Mirror: Off Online: Yes Built-In: Yes

NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M: Chipset Model: NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M Type: GPU Bus: PCIe

POSTED BY: Christopher Cole

Is there a command I type into Mathematica to get what you need? I typed SystemInformation[], but didn't really get what I see in your reply.

POSTED BY: David Arnold

Most of the information is available from the Devices tab in the output of SystemInformation[]. I actually used the System Information tool in OS X which, I think, provides the specific information I require in a more succinct format. You can access this tool by selecting "About this Mac..." from the Apple menu and then clicking on "System Report...".

POSTED BY: Christopher Cole

Maybe About This Mac?

MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013) Processor: 2.3 GHz Intel Core i7 Memory: 16 GB 1600 MHz DDR3 Startup Disk: Macintosh HD Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M 2048MB

Built-in Display 15.4 inch (2880 x 1800) NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M 2048MB

Is this enough?

POSTED BY: David Arnold
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